20/20: Seeing Opportunity Through the Lens of Values

Keynote Speaker - Anne Price

Anne Price is the first woman President of the Insight Center for Community Economic Development, a fifty-year-old economic justice and research organization. Anne sparks ideas for innovative, multi-dimensional solutions to economic and racial inequities and advocates for transformative change that addresses the root causes of economic inequality. She previously led the Closing the Racial Wealth Gap initiative at the Insight Center, elevating the voices and opinions of experts of color in national economic debates and policy making. Her tireless work has brought the issue of the racial wealth gap into mainstream consciousness and vernacular with an explosion of media coverage of the data and research quantifying racial differences in wealth accumulation. Anne was one of the first national thought leaders to examine and push for narrative change in addressing race, gender and wealth inequality. She was also an early adopter of connecting criminal justice debt to racial wealth inequality. Anne has spent more than 25 years working in the public sector on issues that range from child welfare to hunger to workforce development and higher education. 

Anne's work has been featured in the New York Times, The Washington Post, The Mercury News, Citylab, O Magazine, and the Stanford Social Innovation Review and other publications. She has appeared on MSNBC and Noticias Telemundo. Anne is a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute in New York. She also currently serves as Board Chair at United for a Fair Economy in Boston. Anne holds a BA in Economics from Hampton University and a Master's Degree in Urban Affairs and Public Policy from the Milano School of Management and Urban Policy in New York City. 

KEYNOTE: FORGET THE RACIAL WEALTH GAP, IT'S ABOUT THE PLUNDER

Inequality is a defining American issue, and perhaps no measure more accurately exemplifies the failures and injustices of historic and current-day economic decisions than the “racial wealth gap.” Racial wealth inequality is gaining renewed attention as calls to close the racial wealth gap has become a key platform issue for progressive constituencies. The energy of this political moment provides a unique opportunity to evaluate how we have historically framed the racial wealth gap and to consider areas deemed peripheral to conversations about racial wealth inequality. Anne will share why we must extend beyond the goal of closing the racial wealth gap and concentrate on undoing its root causes. Anne will discuss a new framework and a set of solutions that builds organizing power to address racial wealth inequality.


Session Descriptions

  • ADVOCACY EFFORTS: CONNECTING GRASSROOTS EFFORTS WITH STATEWIDE AFFORDABLE HOUSING INITIATIVES

This panel will present two to three efforts across the state where community-based organizations are spearheading campaigns to raise awareness of the affordable housing crises. These campaigns offer diverse solutions and engage distinct audiences. Can they be complimentary and support a state-wide campaign?

  • BUILDING ON THE VALUED ASSETS OF SMALL COMMUNITIES: INDIANA’S HOMETOWN COLLABORATIVE INITIATIVE

Community values and needs provide a broader understanding of a community’s vision, perspectives, and solutions. The Hometown Collaboration Initiative is an innovative resource available to Indiana communities that are committed to building on their existing assets. This presentation will provide insights gained from a systematic research effort aimed at learning about important issues affecting the Town of Cumberland and Brown County. We will highlight pertinent issues uncovered in the Foundation, Building Block and Pathway stages of the project. We will share lessons learned and highlight what communities are concerned about and what they value.

  • HOMELESS AND HOUSING INSTABILITY UNDERSTOOD THROUGH SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH

This interactive session will explore growing evidence that addressing health-related social needs, like isolation and access to on-going health care, can lead to improved housing stability. Moving a person out of chronic homelessness can create the problem of social isolation; they have no positive support system and have left homeless friends behind. This can leave only the behavioral health person to turn to for assistance, leading to compounding problems. This workshop will explore how collaborative efforts to expand the support network, through mentors and other volunteers, can lead to improved health, empowerment and quality of life.

  • HOUSING AND HEALTH: MOVING FROM DATA TO ACTION

The County Health Rankings show that meaningful gaps in health outcomes exist among counties nationwide, largely because of differences in opportunities for health. Our homes play a critical role in shaping individual and community health; when they are near quality schools and good jobs, it’s easier to get a quality education and earn living wages. When people live near grocery stores where nutritious food is available, eating healthy is easier. This session will showcase data, evidence, and tools to help practitioners engage community members in multi-sector collaborations to address housing and health challenges together.

  • HOUSING POLICIES FOR AGING-IN PLACE

By 2035, there will be more people over the age of 65 than under the age of 18 for the first time in U.S. history. These rapidly changing population demographics will bring immense change to communities across the country who will need to find ways to respond to this unprecedented shift. In this session, AARP Indiana will share the specific housing policies and practices it deems most important to help keep older Hoosiers in their homes and communities, where they want to be.

  • HOW TO BUILD AND MAP SOCIAL CAPITAL AND WHY IT MATTERS

Learn from leaders at the Kheprw Institute, Scarabys Consulting, and Purdue Extension about tangible ways individuals, institutions, and communities can build and map social capital for transformational asset building. Social capital is an essential ingredient and facilitator for all forms of capital building, and often underestimated for the role it plays. Community practitioners and experts will teach and demonstrate in real time why and how social capital is a key asset for longā€term resilience for small businesses, communities, and the individuals that connect and form our society. Be prepared to leave today with a coffee date!

  • INTERSECTION OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND ASSET-BUILDING: DESIGNING AND IMPLEMENTING AN ASSET-BASED PROGRAM

"Housing First" is based upon the notion that helping people first obtain stable housing makes other barriers to overall well-being more approachable to overcome. Domestic violence is the leading cause of homelessness among women in the United States. Long-term housing stability is key for survivors to overcome barriers which oftentimes pull them back into abuse. Emergency shelter, while vital, isn't housing. Crisis-focused services aren't adequate to impact long-term housing stability. Coburn Place has designed a Domestic Violence Housing First Program model, offering an array of longer-term housing supports focused on leading to housing stability which can be replicated in other communities. This program assists in building survivor's financial assets, increases economic self-sufficiency and stability along with securing permanent housing as part of the process of stabilization for domestic violence victims and their families.

  • INTRODUCTION TO IMPLICIT BIAS: WHAT'S HIDDEN WITHIN?

Implicit bias is something we all have. This workshop examines what it is, how it differs from overt bias, how to recognize our own, and how we move past bias through action.

  • OPPORTUNITY ZONES: LESSONS LEARNED TO DATE

While the federal Opportunity Zone authorizing legislation was designed to be flexible, complexities and lack of familiarity related to the tax incentive continue to make it seemingly elusive. Hear three unique perspectives – from a private developer, economic development professional and investor, each working on live deals across Indiana – to demystify the private equity tool to fund community development projects. 

  • REAL. CHANGE. NOW!

Inclusive economic development is not just building buildings, it's building people. It’s about making change people can see, touch, and feel right now. Benefit from lessons learned in South Bend – development anywhere impacts residents everywhere. Only through collaborative action among policymakers, business owners, and residents will we achieve our goal of “Development Without Displacement.” Hear strategies for increasing engagement and codifying reflective practice. Learn to use stories as data to identify and fill policy gaps. Apply these lessons to the current debate on a mega-industrial complex threatening thousands of acres of some of the best farmland in Indiana.

  • SOMETIMES IT'S THE RACCOONS IN THE ATTIC: HOW POOR-QUALITY HOUSING AFFECTS CHILDREN'S HEALTH AND EDUCATION

Housing instability has a detrimental effect on families’ physical, mental, and financial health,sending ripples of undesirable consequences throughout the community. Children are especially hard hit when frequent moves and unhealthy home conditions disrupt their education and social development. A neighborhood school system in Indianapolis saw these effects firsthand and realized that in order to improve their school and the children they served, they must help improve their housing options. Learn how the school collaborated with community stakeholders to tackle multiple housing-related issues simultaneously, and how public policies and practices may unintentionally fuel the creation and perpetuation of poor-quality housing.

  • THE HEART OF LASTING CHANGE IN OUR YOUTH

To build real sustainable change that will carry on into the future, we have to give the people who live in these communities a real voice. This is especially true of the children who will not only be impacted by what we do, but will be the people that continue on when we are gone. They need the space to take ownership and build a lasting connection to the place they live and the people around them. We are redefining what it means to serve an individual and a community at the same time. Strengthening our most powerful asset, the people. Pulling together the needed resources through collaborations and partnerships. Advocating across multiple platforms to bring to light the root causes and empowering people to find creative solutions. “No matter where you come from, it is what you do in this moment that defines who you are tomorrow.”

  • THE HIDDEN ADVANTAGES OF OZONES: FEDERAL INCENTIVES

In order to amplify the impact of the Opportunity Zone tax incentive, the White House Opportunity and Revitalization Council has identified more than 180 Federal programs whereby targeting, preference, or additional support can be provided to Opportunity Zones. This session will provide an overview of the complementary federal tools that local leaders can leverage to revitalize their Opportunity Zones, according to four work streams: economic development, education and workforce development, entrepreneurship, and safe neighborhoods.

  • THE ROLE OF THE BACKBONE ORGANIZATIONS TO BRING ABOUT COLLECTIVE IMPACT

    Since the formation of Muncie's 8Twelve Coalition in 2015, it has worked to improve quality of life by addressing needs related to housing, health care, safety, and economic development. This session will describe the role of Greater Muncie Habitat for Humanity as the “back-bone” organization, the coalition structure, and the role of other organizations and residents. Successes and struggles encountered over the last four years will also be highlighted as presenters describe the coalition’s projects, programs, and partnerships through the lens of the housing subcommittee.

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